My Customer Is Me

Not to long ago, NorthTemple.com posted about Joel Dehlin who is the CIO of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. He recently took a new job, and deciding to start blogging. His posts, have been thorogh and interesting look into the the church’s infrastructure.

In a recent post, he talks about bulding software, and the how the church is going about it. An interestin read. You can find it here.

Via Joel Dehlin

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My Customer Is Me

Newcomb’s Paradox: What Would You Do?

Recently, Mark Frauenfelder wrote an interesting article about Newcomb’s Paradox.
Franz Kiekeben (who is a very funny cartoonist) does a nice job of describing Newcomb’s Paradox, which I’ve enjoyed contemplating, on and off, for many years. For those of you that may be unfamilliar with it, here it is.

A highly superior being from another part of the galaxy presents you with two boxes, one open and one closed. In the open box there is a thousand-dollar bill. In the closed box there is either one million dollars or there is nothing. You are to choose between taking both boxes or taking the closed box only. But there’s a catch.

The being claims that he is able to predict what any human being will decide to do. If he predicted you would take only the closed box, then he placed a million dollars in it. But if he predicted you would take both boxes, he left the closed box empty. Furthermore, he has run this experiment with 999 people before, and has been right every time.

What do you do?

On the one hand, the evidence is fairly obvious that if you choose to take only the closed box you will get one million dollars, whereas if you take both boxes you get only a measly thousand. You’d be stupid to take both boxes.

On the other hand, at the time you make your decision, the closed box already is empty or else contains a million dollars. Either way, if you take both boxes you get a thousand dollars more than if you take the closed box only.

What would you do? Please read the rest of Kiekeben’s essay before offering your reasoning. Link

(Via Boing Boing.)

Newcomb’s Paradox: What Would You Do?